Monday, February 29, 2016

interview w/LL on inequality in SF

Lavinia Ludlow's Single Stroke Seven drops on March 1, and I had a chance to ask her questions about the writing life, unaffordable housing, and Bay Area inequality.

From JMWW:

Lavinia Ludlow’s debut novel alt.punk (Casperian Books 2011) immersed us in a world of music, ambition, sex, drugs, and life on the margins of music and the mainstream, so much so that we were left gasping for air. Now Ludlow is back with her second novel, Single Stroke Seven (Casperian Books, March 2016). Her spunky prose packs in so much raw rich detail that I burned through an advanced-review copy. Ludlow describes a San Francisco Bay shadow world of drummers and scroungers I know little about, and her punchy prose kept me engaged in the lives of characters trying to sustain their dreams and themselves under our “new normal” of extreme income inequality, contract work, and a winner-take-all music industry. Single Stroke Seven is the stuff you read in one sitting or return to as soon as work or family allows.

In the following interview, I first asked Lavinia about surviving as a writer/artist on the margins in the increasingly unaffordable San Francisco.

Alex Kudera: You encourage people to read (or re-read) your debut novel, alt.punk, before reading Single Stroke Seven. Why?

Lavinia Ludlow: Single Stroke Seven departs from alt.punk’s extreme narrative voice and...

Follow this link to read the full interview.

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